Nate Beveridge

Nate Beveridge always liked ice skating but he never wanted to play hockey.

To apply his love for ice skating, the 2018 Meadville Area Senior High School graduate decided to take up speedskating last November.

Now, after only a year of being in the sport, Beveridge has his eyes on qualifying for the U.S. Olympic trials in speedskating.

“I just liked ice skating in general, but being able to go faster was just something that I found fun to do,” Beveridge said. “I just enjoy skating.”

Beveridge started speed skating with the Pittsburgh Speedskating Club last November. For Beveridge, starting his speedskating experience with the club was ideal because he was able to get more personalized time with the coaches.

“The coaches there are all really supportive — and the teammates,” Beveridge said. “It’s a smaller club, so you’re able to get a lot of individualized experience and I really enjoyed it there.”

After Beveridge improved, his coaches recommended that he start to compete in races. 

Beveridge’s first race took place in February in Muskegon, Michigan. Beveridge’s times in the Muskegon race qualified him to compete in a race in Salt Lake City. His performance there caught the eye of speed skating coach Simon Cho, who represented Team USA in the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver. Cho told Beveridge that he needed to dedicate more time to work on his craft since he was only getting two days a week of practice in Pittsburgh. 

After talking to his coaches in Pittsburgh, Beveridge decided to move to West Jordan, Utah, a suburb of Salt Lake City, in April to train at the Utah Olympic Oval.

“It’s definitely a different kind of area,” Beveridge said. “It’s completely surrounded by mountains, so if you’re really active with being outdoors and hiking, it’s a really good area. It’s a new area, so everything’s just really nice here.”

After moving to Utah, Beveridge started practicing in short track when the ice went down in May. After the ice went down for long track in July, Beveridge then decided to try it out and found that it was a better fit for him than short track.

According to Beveridge, the two disciplines are very different. The main difference is that short track takes place on an 111-meter track while long track takes place on a 400-meter oval.

“Short track is just a sport that’s really hard to get into,” Beveridge said. “The technical aspect is just a lot. Long track, it’s easier to transition into because it’s all about building as much speed as possible and moving forward, where the short track, you’re out there, you’re racing against other people. In long track, you don’t race against anybody else but the time, so you’re just against yourself.”

Beveridge kept improving in long track and, according to his father, Don Beveridge, he could either train with the U.S. National team with 25 others or train with former Olympic gold-medalist Shani Davis with 10 others. Beveridge chose to train with Davis because he could get more one-on-one time with him. Since they’re paying Davis for the lessons, they cost double the money because they’re also paying for ice time.

“To hear this kid’s got one chance in life to do something like this, you gotta go and do it,” Don Beveridge said.

“Shani has a lot of experience with ice skating, so we just kinda follow everything he says,” Nate Beveridge added. “We have weight training, running, biking and then ice time. We just basically follow what he says because you know he’s been there and done it. He’s gone through all the training and stuff.”

Currently, Beveridge trains six days a week and has two practices a day, one in the morning and one in the afternoon. On top of training for the Olympic trails, Beveridge is also going to school virtually at Clarion University. Beveridge is on track to graduate in May 2022 with a degree in finance.

Beveridge said that juggling practice and schoolwork can sometimes be challenging.

“I mean at times, it does seem like it could be a lot because my training is twice a day,” Beveridge said. “Normally, we have a practice in the morning and then in the afternoon and I just have to kinda squeeze the schoolwork in when I can.”

Beveridge recorded a 39.73 in the 500-meter event last month in Salt Lake City. That’s his best time in the event and it was just 0.73 seconds off qualifying for the Olympic trails, which take place in January.

In the 1000-meter event, his best time is 1.19.03. To qualify for the trials in the 1,000-meter event, Beveridge needs to complete it in one minute and 17 seconds or faster. His personal best in the 1,500-meter event is 2.07.16. Beveridge still has a couple of time trials left in December to get his times up before the Olympic trials take place.

Don Beveridge is impressed with his son’s improving times and the progress he’s made in speed skating, given that he only took up the sport last year.

“He has the brute strength,” Don Beveridge said. “He has the speed in skating. He just doesn’t have the technique, but he’s coming along. Every time that he’s gone to a meet, his times have gotten faster. He’s not jumping tenths of a second, he’s jumping seconds, which is very hard to do, especially when he’s starting to get down to the times.”

Nate Beveridge wants to compete in the Olympics Games somewhere down the road, but for now, he’s only focusing on qualifying for the Olympic trails.

“It’s hard to picture anything right now since it’s still so new,” Beveridge said. “It’s been about three-and-a-half months, four months since I started [long track], so just trying to even work out making the Olympic trials is just so new to me that I don’t have anything pictured.”

After moving to Utah, Beveridge started practicing in short track when the ice went down in May. After the ice went down for long track in July, Beveridge decided to try it out and found that it was a better fit for him than short track.

According to Beveridge, the two disciplines are very different. The main difference is that short track takes place on an 111-meter track while long track takes place on a 400-meter oval.

“Short track is just a sport that’s really hard to get into,” Beveridge said. “The technical aspect is just a lot. Long track, it’s easier to transition into because it’s all about building as much speed as possible and moving forward, where the short track, you’re out there, you’re racing against other people. In long track, you don’t race against anybody else but the time, so you’re just against yourself.”

Beveridge kept improving in long track and, according to his father, Don Beveridge, he could either train with the U.S. national team with 25 others or train with former Olympic gold-medalist Shani Davis with 10 others. 

Beveridge chose to train with Davis because he could get more one-on-one time with him. 

Since they’re paying Davis for the lessons, they cost double the money because they’re also paying for ice time.

“To hear this kid’s got one chance in life to do something like this, you gotta go and do it,” Don Beveridge said.

“Shani has a lot of experience with ice skating, so we just kind of follow everything he says,” Nate Beveridge added. “We have weight training, running, biking and then ice time. We just basically follow what he says because you know he’s been there and done it. He’s gone through all the training and stuff.”

Currently, Beveridge trains six days a week and has two practices a day, one in the morning and one in the afternoon. 

On top of training for the Olympic trails in speedskating, Beveridge is also going to school virtually at Clarion University. Beveridge is on track to graduate in May with a degree in finance.

Beveridge said that juggling practice and schoolwork can sometimes be challenging.

“I mean, at times, it does seem like it could be a lot because my training is twice a day,” Beveridge said. “Normally, we have a practice in the morning and then in the afternoon and I just have to kind of squeeze the schoolwork in when I can.”

Beveridge recorded a time of 39.73 seconds in the 500-meter event last month in Salt Lake City. That’s his best time in the event and it was just 0.73 seconds off qualifying for the Olympic trails, which take place in January.

In the 1,000-meter event, his best time is 1:19.03. To qualify for the trials in the 1,000-meter event, Beveridge needs to complete it in 1:17 or faster. His personal best in the 1,500-meter event is 2:07.16. 

Beveridge still has a couple of time trials left in December to improved his times before the Olympic trials take place.

Don Beveridge is impressed with his son’s improving times and the progress he’s made in speedskating, given that he only took up the sport last year.

“He has the brute strength,” Don Beveridge said. “He has the speed in skating. He just doesn’t have the technique, but he’s coming along. Every time that he’s gone to a meet, his times have gotten faster. He’s not jumping tenths of a second, he’s jumping seconds, which is very hard to do, especially when he’s starting to get down to the times.”

Nate Beveridge wants to compete in the Winter Olympics somewhere down the road, but for now, he’s only focusing on qualifying for the Olympic trails.

“It’s hard to picture anything right now since it’s still so new,” Beveridge said. “It’s been about three-and-a-half months, four months since I started (long track), so just trying to even work out making the Olympic trials is just so new to me that I don’t have anything pictured.”

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