"When the hateful think they are the virtuous" is the title of the Ben Shapiro piece published on Feb. 11. The piece describes another article, from the Los Angeles Times which he calls "perverse" in it's description of the moral quandary of an apparent liberal who has a helpful conservative neighbor.

I hope readers appreciate the irony of both pots and kettles in the scenario. Ben Shapiro engages in exactly the same behavior as the one he criticizes, and under the guise of exposing the lack of virtue of others. That is the problem — neither side is lacking in hypocrisy or virtues, yet they can only see the bad in others. We need to accept that neither side is 100 percent wrong or 100 percent right, and both sides need to stop doing exactly the same things as they are criticizing the other for doing.

If it was wrong when she did it, then it was wrong when he did it, end of story. Perhaps there are situations where both sides cannot be right — in which we need to agree to disagree. Because there is no doubt that there can be any number of situations in which both sides can be wrong. I'm not sure where we lost the idea as a society, that we can still like and appreciate people who have different ideas and agendas, even if we don't agree with them. It might make one of us wrong, but it doesn't have to mean that either one of us are bad people.

TERESA BAILEY

Meadville

React to this story:

2
0
0
0
0

Trending Video

Recommended for you