With the Crawford County Fair opening soon, political races will soon get even more heated than some already are.

The races for county commissioner and county sheriff appear to be the most hotly contested races locally as candidates in both races have been campaigning throughout the county all summer.

At the national level, the recently televised presidential debates give Democrats (and other voters) the opportunity to view potential candidates. I say Democrats mainly because they will choose their nominee for president in 2020.

Debates to me are not how we should base our opinions. To begin with, the televised programs are not true debates. They really are forums. Debates are when two (or more) people are given a subject and one debates the pro side and one the con.

Regardless, however, my feeling is the forums often display how good a person can talk — which is important, but more importantly I think is to research the candidates and vote on their records — not how well they can speak.

On the positive side, the forums give people the opportunity to hear what other candidates are saying and why!

I don't recall in recent history this many televised debates — particularly with only one party represented. But with this many potential candidates, it gives people an opportunity see their performances.

• • •

Last week in Vernon Township, solicitor R. Charles Thomas was conducting the public hearing. As it started, he said if people could not hear him to let him know. He noted as he has gotten older, his voice has become quieter, adding since he no longer has children at home, he doesn't have to raise his voice much!

• • •

Although Vernon Township supervisors added some microphones, the room still has difficulty with acoustics. At the end of the work session, which followed the hearing, supervisors asked Township Manager Rob Horvat to investigate procuring some much-needed equipment.

Ron Anderson, president of Universal Development, which wants to construct more housing, noted he was in the same room 25 years ago and noted nothing has changed — except the supervisors.

• • •

During the hearing, it was suggested that those having issues with the landlord (Anderson) should contact an attorney if the issue was not resolved.

Millie Custard, one of the tenants in housing owned by Anderson, had voiced concerns. She asked Thomas what he would charge her. "Nothing," adding, "I know you," he answered, with a grin.

• • •

Custard was concerned about losing the trees but also about the turkeys and the deer, saying they may be gone as well. She added she didn't care about the bear that apparently is in the area.

• • •

Kathleen Kane, former state attorney general, was released from prison after serving less than her minimum sentence, noting she received time off for "good behavior."

It's not often you hear of inmates being released earlier than their minimum anymore.

• • •

The ballot for 2020 should be interesting as voters will not only choose presidential candidates but U.S. Congress and the state House of Representatives seats. The U.S. and state House of Representatives run every two years.

• • •

Voters in the fall will vote on an amendment to the state constitution which would give victims constitutional rights. Many of those rights listed are now being done (such as notifying victims of upcoming hearings or parole of the offenders), but the change would give them the constitutional right to those.

• • •

We extend condolences to the family of Roy Whaley, a longtime Sadsbury Township supervisor, who passed away last week after a battle with cancer.

He stayed involved with the political system even after he no longer was supervisor, attending many meetings of local government and showing his interest.

Jane Smith is a retired Meadville Tribune reporter who specialized in covering government and politics.

React to this story:

0
0
0
1
0