Judge of the

Superior Court

Job description: The Superior Court is one of Pennsylvania’s two statewide intermediate appellate courts. This court, which was established in 1895, reviews most of the civil and criminal cases that are appealed from the Courts of Common Pleas in the commonwealth’s 67 counties. The Superior Court consists of 15 judges who serve 10-year terms. The president judge of Superior Court is elected to a five-year term by his or her colleagues.

A huge volume of appeals flow to Superior Court from the trial courts. Generally, appeals are heard by panels of three judges sitting in Philadelphia, Harrisburg or Pittsburgh. The court often is the final arbiter of legal disputes. Although the Supreme Court may grant a petition for review of a Superior Court decision, most such petitions are denied and the ruling of the Superior Court stands.

Term: 10 years

Salary: $178,914

(Vote for one)

Question: Because of some public concern about the amount of money being spent on statewide judicial elections, would you support an amendment to the Pennsylvania Constitution changing the method of selecting statewide judges to a merit selection process? Why or why not?

 

Republican

Name: Vic Stabile (Middlesex Township, Carlisle)  

Website: stabileforjudge.com

Date of birth: Sept. 14, 1957  

Education: 1979, State Univer-sity of New York at Stonybrook, bachelor of arts; 1982, Dickinson School of Law, juris doctor.

Occupation: Attorney  

Qualifications: Almost 30 years trial and appellate experience; appellate judicial clerk; deputy attorney general; partner, Dilworth Paxson LLP; recommended by Pennsylva-nia Bar Asso-ciation based upon “solid” appellate experience and “strong intellect.”

Answer to question: Yes, if a true merit selection process would provide fair opportunity for well-qualified people to be considered for judicial office. At present, neither election nor merit selection is a panacea for selecting judges.

 

Democrat

Name: David N. Wecht (Indiana Township, Pittsburgh)

Website: wecht2011.com

Date of birth: May 20, 1962  

Education: 1984, Yale, bachelor of arts; 1987, Yale, juris doctor summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, National Merit Scholar, notes editor of Yale Law Journal; law clerk, 1987-88, U.S. Court of Appeals, D.C. Circuit.

Occupation: Common Pleas judge

Qualifications: Judge since February 2003 (former administrative judge, Family Division). “Highly Recommended” by Pennsylvania and Allegheny County bar associations. Endorsed by Pennsylvania Democratic Party, Allegheny and Philadelphia labor councils, Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 91, Professional Firefighters Local 1. Register of wills, Allegheny County, 1998-2003.

Answer to question: Reasonable people disagree. On the one hand, appointment of judges would eliminate problems posed by campaign fundraising, especially large corporate contributions now permitted by the U.S. Supreme Court. On the other hand, our Constitution should not lightly be amended, particularly where amendment would disenfranchise Pennsylvanians. Those who would alter our Constitution carry a heavy burden. While I am not yet persuaded, I have an open mind and believe the issue merits candid and thoughtful discussion.

 

Judge of the Commonwealth Court

Job description: The Commonwealth Court is one of Pennsylvania’s two statewide intermediate appellate courts. This court, which was established in 1968, is unlike any other state court in the nation. Its jurisdiction generally is limited to legal matters involving state and local government and regulatory agencies. Litigation typically focuses on such subjects as banking, insurance and utility regulation and laws affecting taxation, land use, elections, labor practices and workers compensation. Commonwealth Court also acts as a court of original jurisdiction, or a trial court, when lawsuits are filed by or against the commonwealth.

The Commonwealth Court is made up of nine judges who serve 10-year terms. The president judge is chosen by his or her colleagues for a five-year term. The court generally decides cases in three-judge panels and sits in Philadelphia, Harrisburg and Pittsburgh.

Term: 10 years

Salary: $178,914  

(Vote for one)  

Question: Because of some public concern about the amount of money being spent on statewide judicial elections, would you support an amendment to the Pennsylvania Constitution changing the method of selecting statewide judges to a merit selection process? Why or why not?

Republican

Name: Anne Covey (Upper Makefield Township, New Hope)

Website: coveyforjudge.com

Date of birth: Nov. 4,1959

Education: 1981, Univer-sity of Dela-ware, bachelor of arts with departmental honors; 1984, Widener Univer-sity School of Law, juris doctor cum laude

Occupation: Attorney, law firm founder

Qualifications: Extensive Commonwealth Court experience. Clerked for President Judge Craig. First female Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board member. Practice labor and employment law. Written extensively, including book “The Workplace Law Advisor.”

Answer to question: I believe Pennsylvania residents should continue to have the right to select appellate court judges. There is no assurance that an appointive process will not include the kind of political negotiation and dealing most Pennsylvanians oppose. I have full confidence in the Pennsylvania voters to carefully consider each candidates’ qualifications and make the best judgment. Pennsylvania need not replace elections with back-room deals, but rather rigorously enforce a strong code of ethics and conduct.

 

Democrat

Name: Kathryn Boockvar (Doylestown Township)

Date of birth. Oct. 23, 1968

Website: boockvar.com

Education: 1993, American University, Washington College of Law, juris doctor; 1990, University of Pennsylvania, bachelor of arts; 1996, Lan-caster Mediation Center.

Occupation: Attorney

Qualifications: Advancement Project senior attorney, three years; Boockvar & Yeager partner, 11 years; Legal Services attorney, three years; only Democratic Commonwealth Court candidate recommended by the Pennsylvania Bar Association; Rising Star-Super Lawyer.

Answer to question: Having spent the last three years working for the voters of Pennsylvania, I believe voters deserve a say in who represents them in every branch of government, including the judiciary. I support campaign finance reform, including limits and greater disclosure. I would also like to see a better system for educating the public about candidates, the courts, and why these courts matter in people’s lives, and will affect the lives of their children and grandchildren.

 

Retention election

Retention is specifically designed to keep judges out of the political fray while at the same time holding them accountable to the voters based on their overall records and performance in office. The intent is to provide a fair and nonpartisan way for the public to judge its judges. The Pennsylvania Bar Association seeks to help voters in retention elections by rating incumbent judges who are on the statewide ballot. The Judicial Evaluation Commission reviews the record of each retention candidate and interviews lawyers and others familiar with that judge’s work and temperament. At the conclusion of the 10-year term, a judge may seek another 10-year term via a retention election. A retention election puts the incumbent judge on the ballot. Without party label, with voters simply saying “yes,” the judge deserves another term or “no,” the judge does not deserve another term. Judges can continue to be retained if it is the will of the voters until the mandatory retirement age of 70. (Excerpted from the Unified Judicial System of Pennsylvania website).

Supreme Court

Vote yes or no

Name: J. Michael Eakin of Mechanicsburg  

Elected: 2001 on Republican ballot Term:

January 2002 to December 2011

Education: Franklin & Marshall College, bachelor of arts, 1970; Dickin-son School of Law, juris doctor, 1975.

Military experience: 28th Division, Pennsylvania Army National Guard, 1971-77

Professional experience: Assistant district attorney, Cumberland County, 1975-83; private law practice, Eakin & Eakin, 1980-89; district attorney, Cumberland County, 1984-95; Widener University School of Law adjunct professor; elected a judge of the Pennsylvania Superior Court, 1995; elected a justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, 2001.

Memberships and associations: Cumberland County Bar Association; Dauphin County Bar Association; Criminal Procedural Rules Committee of the Supreme Court, 1994-2001; chair, 1999-2001; Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences; Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association, Executive Committee; education chair, 1987-95; president, 1992-93; Pennsylvania District Attorney Institute, board member, 1987-95; president, 1994-95; National College of District Attorneys, faculty; State Police Youth Camp, Troop H Camp Cadet Inc.

Awards and honors: National College of District Attorneys, Lecturer of Merit Award, 1990; Dickinson School of Law, Career Achievement Award, 2000; Widener University, Honorary Degree of Law, 2005

Personal: Born in 1948, Mechanicsburg.

 

Superior Court

Vote yes or no

Name: Mary Jane Bowes of Pittsburgh

Elected: 2001 on Republican ballot

Term: January 2002 to December 2011

Education: Georgetown University, bachelor of arts, 1976; University of Pittsburgh School of Law, juris doctor, 1979.

Professional experience: Private law practice, 1979-81; judicial law clerk, Superior Court Senior Judge Harry Montgomery, 1980-81; judicial law clerk, Chief Justice of Pennsylvania Henry X. O’Brien, 1981-82; judicial law clerk, Superior Court Senior Judge John P. Hester, 1982-86; private law practice, 1986-98; IT Corp., corporate counsel, 1998-2001; elected judge of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania, 2001.

Memberships and associations: Pennsylvania and Allegheny County bar associations; Women’s Bar Association of Western Pennsylvania, former co-president; St. Anthony Charitable Foundation, chair; Allegheny County Medical Society Foundation, trustee; Allegheny County Finance and Development Commission, former board member; St. Clair Memorial Hospital, former board member; Duquesne University, former board member.

Awards and honors: Elected to Academy of Trial Lawyers of Allegheny County, 1996; Pennsylvania’s 1997 Best 50 Women in Business Award; Pitt Law Women’s Association/Allegheny County Bar Association’s Marjorie Matson Woman of the Year Award, 2007; PBA Special Achievement Award, 2008; Martindale Hubbell AV rating.

Personal: Born in 1954

 

Name: John T. Bender of Pittsburgh  

Term: January 2002 to December 2011

Education: Pennsylvania State University, bachelor of arts; Duquesne University School of Law, juris doctor, 1976

Professional experience: Judicial law clerk, Pennsylvania Superior Court; assistant district attorney, Allegheny County; judicial law clerk, Pennsylvania Supreme Court; private law practice, 25 years; elected a district justice, 1997; elected a judge of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania, 2001.

Memberships and associations: American, Pennsylvania and Allegheny County bar associations.

 

Commonwealth Court

Vote yes or no

Name: Robert E. Simpson Jr. of Nazareth

Term: January 2002 to December 2011

Education: Dickinson College, bachelor of arts magna cum laude, 1973; Dickinson School of Law, juris doctor, 1976.

Professional experience: Judicial law clerk, Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania, 1976-78; private law practice, 1979-89; adjunct professor, Dickinson School of Law, 1998-2005; elected a judge of the Court of Common Pleas of Northampton County, 1989; elected a judge of the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania, 2001.

Memberships and associations: American, Pennsylvania, Dauphin and Northampton County bar associations; Pennsylvania Minor Judiciary Education Board, 1999-2009; Pennsylvania Conference of State Trial Judges; Judge James S. Bowman American Inn of Court; American Society of Writers on Legal Subjects.

Awards and honors: “Highly Recommended” for election to Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court Pennsylvania Bar Association Judicial Evaluation Committee, 2001; Certified Civil Trial Advocate, National Board of Trial Advocacy (certified 1984); Freedom High School Circle of Excellence, inducted May 2000.

Personal: Born in 1951, Harrisburg.

 

Name: Renee Cohn Jubelirer of State College

Term: January 2002 to December 2011

Education: Pennsylvania State University, bachelor of arts, 1978; Northwestern University School of Law, juris doctor cum laude; editor, Law Review, 1983.

Professional experience: Teaching fellow, Stanford Law School, 1983-84; assistant professor, DePaul College of Law, 1985-87; private law practice, 1984-96; deputy solicitor, Lehigh County, 1996-97; assistant solicitor, Lehigh County, 1997-99; counsel, ATX Telecommunications Services, 1997-01; arbitrator, Lehigh County Court of Common Pleas, 1994-01; commissioner, South Whitehall Township, 2000-01; elected a judge of the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania, 2001.

Memberships and associations: American, Pennsylvania and Lehigh County bar associations; Donald E. Wieand Inn of Court; James S. Bowman American Inn of Court; Judges Journal, Editorial Board; Appellate Court Procedural Rules Committee of the Supreme Court, member; Judicial Council of Pennsylvania, Judicial Education Subcommittee; Pennsylvania Conference of State Trial Judges.

Personal: Born in 1957, Pittsburgh.

Name: Mary Hannah Leavitt of Harrisburg

Term: January 2002 to December 2011

Education: Connecticut College, bachelor of arts, 1969; University of Pennsylvania, master of arts, 1972; Dickinson School of Law, juris doctor; Editor, Law Review, 1978.

Professional experience: Assistant counsel, Chief of Litigation and Chief Counsel, Pennsylvania Insurance Department, 1978-87; private law practice, 1987-01; shareholder, Buchanan Ingersoll, 1991-01; adjunct professor, Pennsylvania State University, 1996-1998; elected a judge of the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania, 2001.

Memberships and associations: American, Pennsylvania and Dauphin County bar associations; James S. Bowman American Inn of Court.

Personal: Born in 1947, Cleveland, Ohio. Married to John P. Krill Jr.; three children.

Crawford County commissioner

The three Crawford County commissioners are the chief governing body of the county, forming the legislative and executive branches of the county, and they are authorized to administer human service programs, conduct land-use planning, and operate the county jail. Commissioners also pass ordinances, access all real and personal property for tax purposes, register voters, and maintain county buildings.

Commissioners are responsible for the annual county budget, levying of real estate taxes, and the investment of county funds. Administrative powers and duties of county commissioners encompass registration and elections, assessment of persons and property, human services, veterans’ affairs, economic growth and development, appointment of county personnel, and fiscal management.

Vote for not more  than two

Term: Four years

Salary: $65,812

Republican

Name: Jack Lynch

Address: 21105 Serenity Drive, Meadville

Date of birth: July 24, 1959

Education: 1977 graduate Cardinal Mooney High School, Youngs-town, Ohio; 1984 graduate of Youngs-town State Univer-sity with a bachelor’s of science in civil engineering technology; and 1993 graduate of Cleveland State University with a master’s in urban planning, design and development.

Occupation: Crawford County planning director and manager of Port Meadville Airport.

Experience: Planning director of Crawford County Planning Commission from March 1994 to present; Port Meadville Airport manager with Crawford County Regional Airport Authority from November 2004 to present; graduate teaching assistant at Cleveland State University, September 1991 to June 1993; property management officer/new project ventures at Riggs National Bank, Washington, D.C., September 1987 to September 1991; and design/project engineer at American Handling Co., Cleveland, September 1984 to September 1987.

What is the No. 1 problem facing Crawford County and what specifically would you propose to solve it? (75 words or less)

Finances. Clarify the roles and responsibilities of all financial actors, internal and external to Crawford County. This will be accomplished by procurement of an independent auditing firm tasked with performing an audit of county finances within a regulated administrative framework. The 2012 budget will follow a revised timetable with defined fiscal policy objectives, execution and monitoring. Transparently, the public will see comprehensive information on past, current and projected fiscal activity including debt and capital expenditures.

Name: Francis F. Weiderspahn Jr.

Address: 1883 State Road, Cochranton

Date of birth: Aug. 21, 1954

Education: 1972 graduate of the former Townville High School.

Occupation: Self-employed dairy farmer, Yahweh Dairy Farm, Cochranton area.

Experience: I have the valuable experience of serving on numerous church, service, civic and agriculture-related boards and commissions, often in leadership positions. For the past several years, I have worked with the county commissioners and the county planning office on various projects at the fairgrounds. I was directly responsible for fundraising for these projects which included seeking and securing funds from state and federal elected officials.

What is the No. 1 problem facing Crawford County and what specifically would you propose to solve it? (75 words or less)

The condition of the courthouse and the purchase of the Talon building. We need to have a line item in the county budget for repairs and maintenance to the courthouse (currently there is not). Following the recommendations of the Community Advisory Committee, make an informed decision as to the future of Talon. I would propose whatever course of action is taken be done in stages to minimize the burden on the taxpayers.

Democrat

Name: C. Sherman Allen

Address: 11367 State Highway 285, Conneaut Lake

Date of birth: Dec. 15, 1954

Education: 1972 graduate of Conneaut Lake Hugh School (in top 10 percent); 1976 graduate of Reppert Auction School.

Occupation: County commissioner for three years and 10 months; auctioneer-marketing consultant; and partner in family’s 600-acre dairy-crop farm operation.

Experience: County commissioner for three years and 10 months; life experiences from working with people; and “The School of Hard Knocks.”

What is the No. 1 problem facing Crawford County and what specifically would you propose to solve it? (75 words or less)

 The No. 1 problem facing the county is solving the facilities needs to allow more efficient use and better coordination of county operations in a manner that is the most cost efficient for the county taxpayers. The establishment of the Citizens Advisory Committee is the first step. I will continue to work with them to resolve this in a manner that is best for everyone — the county departments/agencies, citizens and the taxpayers.

Name: Patricia Gillette

Address: Spring Township

Date of birth: 1955

Education: Honors bachelor of science degree from Edinboro University of Pennsylvania in secondary education social studies with a focus in sociology/psychology, including psychology of aging, methods in sociological research courses, along with detailed studies involving business structures, business profit/loss models, Federal Reserve system, interest, money, banking, debt, credit, economic indicator trends, trade policies, market pricing, commodity levels/prices, business strategies, promotional techniques, evaluation processing, comparative analysis, societal issues, implementation of planning, multi-media presentation, elements of design and a variety of other areas of study applicable for a county commissioner such as computer programming and geology. Also holds an additional certification in art and has graduate credit involving technology, curriculum, management techniques and others.

Occupation: High school social studies teacher.

Experience: Agricultural roots including 4-H dairy and horse projects, varied jobs from sales clerk and nurse’s aide to working for Educational Testing Services administering insurance tests. Professional experience includes 28 years performing fiduciary duties, instructing students in American history, world history, geography, sociology, 15 years teaching economics including money, banking, credit, debt, etc., and over 18 years teaching U.S. government. Lastly, lifelong community involvement from high school chorus/yearbook/newspaper/cheerleading through adult service with Boy Scouts, Rotary, Grange and community choirs.   

What is the No. 1 problem facing Crawford County and what specifically would you propose to solve it? (75 words or less)

A lack of living-wage jobs to retain and attract talented/younger workers. More opportunities would increase tax revenues, relieving budgetary constraints and helping fund courthouse renovations and rising county expenses. The status quo means current workers will suffer tax increases and force delayed retirements, eventually becoming burdened, fixed-income retirees. I will include residents with business and funding acumen in helping me create working models for growth, such as mentoring programs.

Crawford County treasurer

The Crawford County treasurer is elected by the general public and is responsible for receipt, custody and disbursement of monies and, as an agent of the state, the issuing of dog, hunting and fishing licenses.

As an agent of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the Treasurer’s Office issues dog licenses, fishing licenses, hunting licenses and game of chance licenses. The office also issues sportsman’s firearm permits.

Vote for one

Term: Two years

Salary: $58,882

Republican

Name: Christine Krzysiak

Address: 19860 Bear Road, Venango

Age: 47 years old.

Education: Cambridge Springs High School; Clarion University with a degree in business

Occupa-tion: Crawford County treasurer and tax claim bureau director

Experience: Crawford County treasurer, currently; 18 years experience in Crawford County clerk of courts office with nine of these years as deputy; five years as Venango Township tax collector; and eight years as Realtor with ERA Richmond Real Estate

What is the No. 1 problem facing the office of Crawford County treasurer and what specifically would you propose to solve it? (75 words or less)

This is an opportunity for the office to become more efficient and accessible through technology. I am reproducing forms on the computer to expedite processing their completion. I am interviewing credit-card companies to add this option for payment and online processing. Information is being added to the website for public access. Transferring accounting records to the computer is almost complete for easier accessibility and transparency. Future plans include adding scanners for record storage automation.

Democrat

Name: Brad Cronin

Address: 970 Second St., Meadville (West Mead Township)

Date of birth: July 28, 1963.

Education: Bachelor of science degree in business administration and accounting from Edinboro University

Occupation: For the past 18 years, I have managed a small business in the Crawford County community.

Experience: My job experience consists of working in two different firms doing personal and business taxes and the running of a local family business for the past 18 years. In addition to this, I have managed retail stores grossing $10 million to $15 million along with overseeing up to 150 employees. I have also sold real estate.

What is the No. 1 problem facing the office of Crawford County treasurer and what specifically would you propose to solve it? (75 words or less)

The principal issue facing the treasurer’s office is fiscal responsibility. I would incorporate the tax claim bureau into the treasurer’s office creating over $14,000 in savings every year. Freezing the treasurer’s salary for the length of term would create more savings. Releasing funds to the municipalities in a more prompt manner would better allow them to meet their financial responsibilities. To improve transparency as treasurer, I would increase accessibility to the office and myself.

Crawford County

Recorder of deeds/register of wills

The Register and Recorder’s Office is the repository and record manager for all papers relating to wills and estates as well as all real estate transactions in Crawford County. The documents are part of the county’s permanent records and must be protected from loss, theft or damage. It is also the responsibility of the office to provide efficient and timely service to the public while preserving the integrity of public records.

The recorder of deeds records all documents pertaining to land and property transactions, including deeds, mortgages, leases, liens, surveys, financing statements and rights of way.

The register of wills is responsible for filing all papers in reference to the probate of wills and estates and all other related documents.

Vote for one

Term: Four years

Salary: $58,882 recorder; $5,929 register.

Republican

Name: Deborah Curry

Address: 22936 Cannon Hollow Road, Saegertown

Date of birth: July 31, 1956.

Education: 1974 graduate of Saegertown High School

Occupa-tion: Deputy register and recorder of Crawford County.

Experience: I have served as the deputy register and recorder for the past 11 years. I have a total of 30 years experience in the office of register and recorder.

What is the No. 1 problem facing the register/recorder’s office in Crawford County and what specifically would you propose to solve it? (75 words or less)

To improve the technology infrastructure by expanding our official website to include more detailed information about the processes and document requirements for recording documents and filing estate papers. In August 2011, our register of wills indexes and docket entries from 2001 to the present became available online for public use. I feel my 30 years experience provide me with insight on what is needed to keep the office moving forward technologically to serve the public.

Democrat

Name: Keith Abbott

Address: 20114 Stauffer Road, Meadville

Date of birth: June 25, 1954

Education: Penn State, two years; Talon Inc. tooling apprentice training, 8,000 hours

Occupation: Journeyman in the tool and die trade.

Experience: Journeyman in the tool and die trade.

What is the No. 1 problem facing the register/recorder’s office in Crawford County and what specifically would you propose to solve it? (75 words or less)

As in the tool trade I have learned lean manufacturing is the most efficient way to make and to stay in business. I would bring that thought process to the Office of Register and Recorder. I want our tax money being used the most efficient way.

Vernon Township supervisor

The Board of Township Supervisors is the chief governing body of Vernon. Supervisors are responsible for the annual township budget, levying of real estate taxes in the township, and maintenance of township roads.

Vote for not more than two

Term: Six years

Salary: $2,500

Republican

Name: Tim Mullen

Did not provide answers to questionnaire.

Name: Gary R. Wagner

Address: 11525 Pennsylvania Ave., Meadville.

Date of birth: Oct. 1, 1948.

Education: High school; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, rank sergeant E-5.

Occupation: Land surveyor

Experience: Vernon Township supervisor for 12 years; land surveyor 22 years; combat veteran in Vietnam obtaining rank of sergeant E-5; past commander American Legion Post 111 of Meadville.

What is your No. 1 priority for the township if elected? (75 words or less)

Keep taxes low. Pave the few gravel roads remaining in the township. Develop the Route 322 corridor. Continue to pursue grants for road improvements and recreation in the township.

Democrat

Name: Bruce Lallier

Address: 10535 Pine Road, Conneaut Lake

Date of birth: May 1, 1944

Education: Crosby High School and University of Connecticut 1962-66

Occupa-tion: Retired unit manager, Pennsylvania Department of Corrections State Correctional Institution at Albion.

Experience: Sergeant in U.S. Air Force 1966 to 1969; 25 years of management experience to include director of HELP unit at Meadville Medical Center and unit manager State Correctional Institution at Albion.

What is your No. 1 priority for the township if elected? (75 words or less)

Vernon Township adopted a new comprehensive plan outlining projects designed to improve the township. It strikes a good balance between commercial growth and maintaining high quality residential areas. The plan requires infrastructure upgrades for both. My opponents believe it’s acceptable to apply for and receive $20,000 in benefits for a position paying $2,500 per year. I believe the money could be more wisely spent for these projects and will work toward that goal.  

Court of Common

Pleas judges

Two of Crawford County’s three Court of Common Pleas judges are up for retention on the Nov. 8 ballot.

Judicial retention is a system of retaining judges for additional terms after they have been elected on a partisan, contested ballot.

The only question confronting the voter is whether or not each of the judges should be retained.

Salary: $164,602

Vote yes or no

Name: Anthony J. Vardaro

Address: Meadville

Date of birth: April 9, 1954

Education: 1972 graduate of Meadville Area Senior High School; 1976 graduate of Allegheny College with bachelor of arts degree in political science and psychology; 1980 graduate of University of Pittsburgh School of Law.

Occupation: Crawford County Court of Common Pleas judge. First elected to a 10-year term in 1991; retained for another 10-year term in 2001.

Name: John Spataro

Address: Meadville

Date of birth: Sept. 30, 1953

Education: 1975 graduate of Edinboro University of Pennsylvania with a bachelor’s degree in history; 1977 graduate of Edinboro University of Pennsylvania with a master’s degree in political science; and November 1979 graduate of Ohio Northern University School of Law, graduated “with distinction,” second in a class of 159 students.

Occupation: Crawford County Court of Common Pleas judge. First elected to a 10-year term in 2001.

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