Meadville Tribune

State News

June 23, 2013

Pa. bill would hike funds for schools safety

HARRISBURG — A measure that would provide as much as $10 million in new grant dollars, including funding to help compensate local governments for placing police officers in school, has been approved by a House education committee.

If the budget includes the full $10 million, it will increase state spending on school safety in Pennsylvania by 1,900 percent.

The bill was authored by Sen. President Pro Tem Joseph Scarnati, R-Jefferson County. The full Senate voted 49-0 to approve Scarnati’s bill earlier this spring.

Last year, Pennsylvania divided just under $500,000 in safe school grants that were divided between 37 of the commonwealth’s 500 school districts. Those grants were supposed to be used for things such as anti-bullying efforts and district-wide safety planning.

In 2011-12, almost half of the schools districts in Pennsylvania had school security officers or police officers stations in schools, according to data provided by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. But many of those school districts deployed school security officers rather than fully-trained police officers, government data shows.

The districts and local governments that provided the police had to absorb the cost. The Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency used to help pay for police in schools, but the commission cut off funding in 2009, a spokesman said.

Scarnati’s bill, crafted in the wake of the Sandy Hook tragedy, would provide as much as $4 million to offer more of the existing grants to more schools. The remainder of the money in the program would be funneled to municipalities to help them pay for police officers who would be stationed in schools.

State Rep. Mark Longietti, D-Mercer County, sits on the education committee, which approved the bill, 23-0.

Longietti said that the funding for the school resource officers would most likely be made year-to-year. But since the police officers would be members of the municipal forces, they could be assigned other duties if the state funding were to dry up, he said.

Longietti said he supported the bill because it’s completely voluntary. The legislation would simply provide the funding and then allow local officials to decide whether they want a law enforcement presence in school.

That has civil libertarians worried.

“Putting money out there for it will inevitably attract the interest of more schools, like bugs to a light,” said Andrew Hoover, legislative director of the ACLU in Pennsylvania.

The ACLU objects to the bill because there is research showing that minority students and students with disabilities are more likely to come into contact with school-based police than their white or non-disabled classmates, Hoover said.

Longietti said that because the prime sponsor of the bill is Scarnati, a member of the Republican leadership in the Senate, it would not be surprising if the grant program gets funding in the budget. But first, the bill must be voted on by the full House.

A spokesman for Scarnati said the senator remains optimistic that the House will approve the bill before the end of the June session so that the dollars will be able to put police in schools come fall.

Finnerty reports from Harrisburg for Community Newspaper Holdings Inc.’s Pennsylvania newspapers, including The Meadville Tribune. Follow him on Twitter @cnhipa.

- School districts with police presence in 2011-12

Crawford County: Crawford Central

Mercer County: Hermitage, Reynolds and West Middlesex

-School districts with school security officers in 2011-12

Crawford County: None

Mercer County: Farrell

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