Meadville Tribune

Opinion

August 14, 2013

Column: Beware those who bear the gift of democracy

WEST MEAD TOWNSHIP — Following the current events in Egypt, one should wonder what democracy and the democratic process is all about. In 2011, former president of Egypt Hosni Mubarak was ousted after 18 days of demonstrations. The people of Egypt decided that they did not want to live any longer under a dictatorship.

An election to choose a new president was held in June 2012. On June 24, 2012, the New York Times reported that Mohamed Morsi was the winner with 51.7 percent of the runoff votes. The newspaper called the transition an “ambiguous milestone in Egypt’s promised transition to democracy.” It stands to reason why the New York Times called the outcome “ambiguous” since Morsi was the head of the Muslim Brotherhood, which believes in the stricter interpretation of the Koran, which definitely has nothing in common with democracy.

It did not take long for the other half of the Egyptian population to understand that the course the Brotherhood was heading toward was not democratic.

David Brooks in his opinion column of July 4, 2013, in the New York Times said that “Those who emphasize substance, on the other hand, argue that members of the Muslim Brotherhood are defined by certain beliefs. They reject pluralism, secular democracy and, to some degree, modernity. When you elect fanatics, they continue, you have not advanced democracy. You have empowered people who are going to wind up subverting democracy.” It sounds as if history has told us that this has happened before.

“I will employ my strength for the welfare of the German people, protect the Constitution and laws of the German people, conscientiously discharge the duties imposed on me and conduct my affairs of office impartially and with justice to everyone,” Adolf Hitler said in 1933 when he was appointed as chancellor of Germany. How long did he take to turn into a dictator and cause the deaths of millions?

The establishment of an Islamic Republic in Iran took place on April 1, 1979, soon after a democratic-theocratic hybrid constitution was approved. Why anybody would believe that democratic and theocratic could live side by side is behind belief. Now, we know that the Islamic Republic of Iran is everything other than democratic.

This brings us to our present situation. “I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States” is the oath of office our present president of the Unites States of America, Barack Obama, has taken twice. Has this president lived up to the oath he has taken or is he following the footsteps of the aforementioned world leaders?

I believe Obama picks and chooses which laws to enforce and more importantly he sidesteps congress as Jennifer Rubin pointed out in her article “Obama vs. the rule of law,” published in The Washington Post on June 17, 2012. The Founding Fathers of America created a system of checks and balances by which not one of the three branch of our federal government could turn our republic into a dictatorship.

What do the German and Iranian history and American current events have in common? The major protagonists promised the people of their respective countries that they would discharge the duties and affairs of their offices impartially and with justice to everyone. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has been involved in suppressing conservatives’ organizations, leading to lawsuits for violation of constitutional rights (“Conservative groups take IRS, top Obama official to court,” CNN, May 29, 2013).

The president interjects himself with the justice system (State of Florida vs. George Zimmerman). On July 2, 2013, he suspended the Affordable Care Act’s employer health-insurance mandate as required by the law itself. The Washington Times reported on July 17, 2013, that the Fourth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Obama violated the Constitution last year when he made recess appointments to the National Labor Relations Board and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Are there other instances whereas the president of the U.S. has overstepped his boundaries? This is one question that every responsible American should spend time in researching.

We as a free people definitely do not want anyone in the U.S. to preach democracy and at the same time lay the foundation of a dictatorship. Should we beware of politicians who preach democracy? Just think of the word democracy as today’s Trojan horse.

DeFrancesco, a Republican State Committee member, is a Richmond Township resident. He can be contacted at lsdefrank@yahoo.com.

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